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The Job Searching Mistakes People Keep Making

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The Job Searching Mistakes People Keep Making

January is the most popular time of the year to look for a job with up to 1 in 5 on the lookout for pastures new according to company review site Glassdoor. With so many of you looking right now, we thought we’d share 5 job searching mistakes we experience people make every day.

1. You’re Only Going After Big Companies

It’s good to have a big brand employer on your C.V but the experience and salary you can get elsewhere are often just as precious. As a top industry buff, you should get to know who the up- and-comers are in your industry anyway. Why not apply for positions with them? Working for fast-growing smaller companies often presents unique opportunities for growth including side step job moves and rapid promotional opportunities not available in corporate companies. Smaller companies often provide the opportunity to work on juicier projects with fewer layers of management and red tape that comes with corporate organisations.

2. Using a generic C.V for every job

Your C.V should read like a 1-2-1 conversation between you and the hiring manager so make it connect. It’s good to have a generic C.V as a template to pull core details from, but you must tailor your C.V to the role and company in question. A job with the same title across 20 companies will still want you to focus on specific skills and character traits within that umbrella on balance. Mimic the language used in the job advert.

3. Following up with the recruiter direct

If you are applying to an advert posted by a Recruiter, give them a call. Find out a bit more about the role to see what will make you a good fit. This will make your name ‘pop’ in the shortlisting exercise and give you the opportunity to find out more information about the role to write to better job application. Give the recruiter a link to your LinkedIn profile and connect with them on LinkedIn if possible.

4. Not knowing your market value

Research your worth online. There are so many salary surveys and benchmarking tools on the internet that there are no excuses for you or your employer to put you on a package below your market value. Research your worth. So many people accept pay rises below what their level and years of experience actually commands. Asking for more isn’t enough, the best way to get the remuneration package you require is to be prepared with a salary figure and evidence justifying it when the question of compensation comes up.

5. You only apply if you fit all the criteria

Just because you don’t fit ALL the experience on the advert doesn’t mean you shouldn’t apply. Firstly, you don’t know what the hiring manager may be willing to set aside (or train you on) above what you do have. Nowadays, aside from core skills, employers are very much about ‘best company fit’ and soft skills like character traits and personality.  You may also find you overcompensate on a particular prerequisite they want above another. Create openings for yourself. Girls…. studies found you were more guilty of this over men. Just because you don’t tick EVERY box, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t apply. Don’t sell yourself short and create those openings!

What job searching tricks have worked for you? We’d love to hear about them!

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